Christopher Smith

Fall Transitions: Where’d The Bass Go?

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High Mountain Lake in AutumnKevin VanDam knows his bass fishing and especially his smallmouth bass fishing with home lakes in Michigan just chock full of bronzebacks.

Let’s take a look at an excerpt from one of his recent blog posts on fall transitions:

Labor Day weekend in Michigan signals the end of summer for many people who already are putting away boats, taking out docks and preparing for winter.

The lakes are emptying fast even though we’re coming off a week of 90-degree weather and balmy days.

Football season is underway, hunting seasons are opening, kids are in school and people have other things to do. That translates to less fishing pressure on the water.

It still amazes me, but it’s good news to fishermen because early September also signals the beginning of a very good fishing season.

It’s no different than what occurs in other parts of the country; it just happens later in warmer weather climates.

I’m not saying the fall fishing season is in full swing, but it is beginning in the north. Despite the hot weather, bass and baitfish are beginning to make that move. While we put a lot of emphasis on water temperature, the fish use shorter days as a signal to start that fall transition. That’s what triggers Mother Nature’s time clock.

Read the rest of the story here…

Take special note of what Kevin says about baitfish. The sooner you find schools of bait, the sooner you’ll find bass. They want to fatten up and aren’t just chillin’, hanging out and looking for chicks. They have a long winter ahead and need to feed.

If you have fall transition tips, feel free to comment below or even share some of your wisdom with a blog post here: click

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